Stomolophus meleagris

Stomolophus meleagris Agssiz, 1862

Languages: English

Description

Size

Dome-shaped bell can be up to 25 cm (10 inches) in diameter.

Author(s): Wolf, Elizabeth
Rights holder(s): Wolf, Elizabeth

Ecology and Distribution

Distribution

'Stomolophus is usually described as the most abundant scyphozoan in the Gulf, particularly in the late summer and fall when it 'swarms' around inlet passes.' (Rountree 1983)

Author(s): Wolf, Elizabeth
Rights holder(s): Wolf, Elizabeth

Ecology

'The scyphozoan Stomolophus meleagris , when disturbed (held in a container), discharges a sticky mucus. Toxins released into the mucus and water kill some fish and crustaceans and can immediately alter fish behavior, but did not affect a crab predator of S. meleagris . The mucus contains discharged and undischarged nematocysts. The toxins in the mucus are probably associated with these nematocysts.' (Oldendorf 1988)

Author(s): Wolf, Elizabeth
Rights holder(s): Wolf, Elizabeth

Life Cycle

'After swimming actively for 2-5 days, the ciliated planula larvae settled and scyphistoma morphogenesis occurred. Fully developed scyphistomae were cone-shaped and bore a whorl of about 16 tentacles around a dome- or knob-shaped proboscis. Podocyst formation was the only observed method of asexual reproduction in cultures of scyphistomae maintained for one month. Strobilation began as soon as nine days after scyphistoma morphogenesis and occurred in scyphistomae with as few as eight tentacles... Most strobilae produced two ephyrae each, although the number varied from one to three. Some scyphistomae began to strobilate a second time within a week after completion of an initial round of strobilation.' (Calder 1982)

Author(s): Wolf, Elizabeth
Rights holder(s): Wolf, Elizabeth

Trophic Strategy

Feed on zooplankton and red drum larvae. 

Author(s): Wolf, Elizabeth
Rights holder(s): Wolf, Elizabeth

Relevance

Uses

'A pilot plant process was developed to produce salted dried jellyfish product from cannonball jellyfish (Stomolophus meleagris). Processed products containing an average of 68% moisture, 5.5% protein, 26% ash and 25% salt were obtained by brining with different mixtures of salt (7.5–25%) and alum (1–2.5%) over 1 wk. Mechanical drying was also tested by using a heat pump system dryer. Chemical and physical analyses and sensory properties of cannonball jellyfish products compared favorably with market products. Levels of calcium, magnesium and iron in the jellyfish were higher than those of zinc and copper.' (Huang 2006)

Author(s): Wolf, Elizabeth
Rights holder(s): Wolf, Elizabeth

References

Calder, D. R. (1982).  Life History of the Cannonball Jellyfish, Stomolophus Meleagris L. Agassiz, 1860. Biology Bullention. 162, 149-162.
HUANG, Y.AO-WEN. (2006).  Cannonball Jellyfish (Stomolophus meleagris) as a Food Resource. Journal of Food Science. 53(2), 341-343.
Oldendorf (1988).  Chemical defense in a scyphomedusa. Marine ecology progress series. 45(1-2), 81-86.
Rountree, R A. (1983).  The Ecology of Stomolophus Meleagris. Biological Sciences. Honors Program, 69. Wilmington: The University of North Carolina at Wilmington.